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The Leibniz-IZW is an internationally renowned German research institute. It is part of the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. and a member of the Leibniz Association. Our goal is to understand the adaptability of wildlife in the context of global change and to contribute to the enhancement of the survival of viable wildlife populations. For this purpose, we investigate the diversity of life histories, the mechanisms of evolutionary adaptations and their limits, including diseases, as well as the interrelations of wildlife with their environment and people. We use expertise from biology and veterinary medicine in an interdisciplinary approach to conduct fundamental and applied research – from the molecular to the landscape level – in close dialogue with the public and stakeholders. Additionally, we are committed to unique and high-quality services for the scientific community.

News

Author: Leibniz-IZW
Author: Leibniz-IZW

Rhino sperm from the cold – new cryoprotective increases motility of sperm after thawing

A new mixture of cryoprotectives allows for an unprecedented high motility of frozen rhinoceros sperm after thawing, report scientists from the Institute for Zoo and Wildlife research (IZW) in Berlin, Germany. These new cryoprotectives can increase the prospects of utilising assisted reproduction techniques for many endangered wildlife species. The study, based on three rhinoceros species, has been published on 11th July2018 in the journal PLOS ONE.

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Ovum pick up southern white rhino Author: Leibniz-IZW
Ovum pick up southern white rhino Author: Leibniz-IZW

A breakthrough to rescue the Northern White Rhino – First ever hybrid embryo produced outside the womb

Northern White Rhinos (NWR) are functionally extinct, as only two females of this species are left on the planet. An international team of scientists has now successfully created hybrid embryos from Southern White Rhino (SWR) eggs and NWR sperm using assisted reproduction techniques (ART).  This is the first, ever reported, generation of blastocysts (a pre-implantation embryos) of rhinos in a test tube. Additionally, the international team established stem cell lines from blastocysts of the SWR with typical features of embryonic stem cells. This breakthrough is published in Nature Communications today.

 

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Press conference - invitation

You are cordially invited to our press conference presenting groundbreaking research results in our international project.

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Cheetahs / Author: Leibniz-IZW, Cheetah Project Namibia
Cheetahs / Author: Leibniz-IZW, Cheetah Project Namibia

Territory holders and floaters: two spatial tactics of male cheetahs

Scientists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz IZW) in Berlin analysed the spatial behaviour of cheetahs. They showed that male cheetahs operate two space use tactics which are associated with different life-history stages. This long-term study on movement data of over 160 free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia has now been published in the scientific journal ECOSPHERE.

 

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Lynx / Author: Ralph Frank, WWF
Lynx / Author: Ralph Frank, WWF

Lynxes in danger

A new study suggests that humans are putting pressure on the population of these big cats in the Germany-Czech Republic-Austria border area.

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Author: pixabay.com

Dry landscapes can increase disease transmission

In water-limited landscapes sick animals can have increased contact with healthy individuals, which can facilitate disease transmission. Scientists from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) present these findings in the British Ecological Society journal Functional Ecology.

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Large antlered muntjac, Authors: Leibniz IZW, WWF-Vietnam, USAID Song Thanh Nature Reserve
Large antlered muntjac, Authors: Leibniz IZW, WWF-Vietnam, USAID Song Thanh Nature Reserve

First record of large-antlered muntjac in Quang Nam, Vietnam, in the wild provides new hope for the survival of this species

Quang Nam – 21st May, 2018 - In November 2017 - under a biodiversity monitoring and assessment activity supported by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) - scientists and conservationists of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and WWF-Vietnam captured photographs of one of the rarest and most threatened mammal species of Southeast Asia, the large-antlered muntjac (Muntiacus vuquangensis), in Quang Nam province, central Vietnam. Prior to this milestone, this species had only been camera trapped in three protected areas in all of Vietnam since the year 2000. The new records from Quang Nam - which include photographs of both a male and a female - provide new hope for the continued survival of a species that is on the brink of extinction.

 

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DNA, Author: pixabay.com
DNA, Author: pixabay.com

The dark side of our genes – healthy ageing in modern times

The transition to modernity – largely driven by the Industrial Revolution – provided us with easier access to food and clean water, with antibiotics, vaccines, and modern medicine. Yet modernity did not just bring fewer infectious diseases and longer life: it also created an environment radically different from the one we evolved in. Genes helpful in our evolutionary past may now predispose us to chronic disease – such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer – in old ages. In a paper published in the journal Nature Review Genetics an international team of five scientists collate the evidence for this mismatch between past evolutionary adaptation and our modern lives. They also ask whether natural selection linked to modernization might reduce globally the burden of some chronic diseases.

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