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The Leibniz-IZW is an internationally renowned German research institute. It is part of the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. and a member of the Leibniz Association. Our goal is to understand the adaptability of wildlife in the context of global change and to contribute to the enhancement of the survival of viable wildlife populations. For this purpose, we investigate the diversity of life histories, the mechanisms of evolutionary adaptations and their limits, including diseases, as well as the interrelations of wildlife with their environment and people. We use expertise from biology and veterinary medicine in an interdisciplinary approach to conduct fundamental and applied research – from the molecular to the landscape level – in close dialogue with the public and stakeholders. Additionally, we are committed to unique and high-quality services for the scientific community.

+++ Current information on African swine fever: The Leibniz-IZW conducts research on the population dynamics, on models of disease outbreaks in wild boars and on the ecology and human-wildlife interaction in urban areas. African swine fever is a reportable disease in domestic swine and therefor is the purview of the respective federal state laboratories and the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut (Federal Research Institute for Animal Health) FLI. +++

News

 

Wild Koala Foto: A. Gillett
Wild Koala Foto: A. Gillett

Retroviruses are re-writing the koala genome and causing cancer

Koalas are facing multiple environmental and health issues which threaten their survival. Along with habitat loss - accelerated by last year’s devastating bush fires – domestic dog attacks and road accidents, they suffer from deadly chlamydial infections and extremely high frequency of cancer. An international team of scientists led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) now demonstrate that a retrovirus invading the koala germline explains the high frequency of koala cancer. The results are reported in the journal Nature Communications.

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Anti-Human Trafficking Compliance Plan

USAID Biodiversity Conservation Activity

In order to comply with the WWF "trafficking in persons" (TIP) policy Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FVB) has developed this Anti-Human Trafficking Compliance Plan (AHTCP) within the framework of the USAID Biodiversity Conservation Activity.

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Spalax ehrenbergi (Photo: Bassem18, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3032473)
Spalax ehrenbergi (Photo: Bassem18, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3032473)

Genomic and epigenomic analyses reveal speciation in mole rat populations without sharp separation

For new species to evolve, conventional wisdom suggests that geographically isolated populations must exist that form separate reproductive communities. This isolation allows the genomes to slowly diverge and thus form new species. An international research team with participation of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and the University of Haifa has now reconstructed the first reported case of localspeciation within a common gene pool in subterranean mole rats, a group of species which are rodents. Four out of five mole rat species of the superspecies Spalax ehrenbergi originated due to climate divergence over the past 1.5 million years, regionally across the country, and locally in the Upper Galilee through geological and soil microscale adaptive divergence in the last 228,000 years without chromosomal divergence in a common region. The latter local mechanism is called "sympatric speciation" and has now been demonstrated for the first time in a subterranean mammal in the team's paper published in the “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America”.

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Zebras at a waterhole in East Africa (Photo: Peter Seeber)
Zebras at a waterhole in East Africa (Photo: Peter Seeber)

Water is a probable vector for mammalian virus transmission

Water is a necessity for all life but its availability can be limited. In geographical areas experiencing dry seasons, animals congregate near the few freshwater sources, often reaching large densities. At these sites many animals from different species come to the same spots to drink, potentially operating as key locations for pathogen transmission within and between species. An international team of scientists lead by the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) suggests that viruses can use restricted freshwater sources as a vector to be spread among animals. The key prediction of this idea is that animal viruses remain stable and infectious in water. The team tested this idea by sampling water holes in ecosystems of Africa and Mongolia with pronounced dry seasons and growing viruses in such water. The scientific results demonstrated that this was indeed possible and are published in “Science of the Total Environment”.

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BioRescue Team at work, Leibniz-IZW
BioRescue Team at work, Leibniz-IZW

Covid-19 vs conservation – how the northern white rhino rescue programme overcame challenges posed by a global pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic - caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 - has changed the life of people everywhere and affected economic, cultural, social and political processes. Research and conservation are not exempt from these negative effects, whereas positive consequences of an “anthropause” on the environment are controversially discussed. The BioRescue research project, a programme aiming at saving the northern white rhinoceros from extinction, exemplifies the challenges to overcome when conducting research and conservation in an international consortium in times of a global pandemic. COVID-19 hampered communication and travels, prevented or delayed crucial procedures, caused losses in revenues and by that may have lowered the chances of a survival of the northern white rhino. The consortium adjusted strategies, gained valuable knowledge during these challenging times and continued with its mission. The effects of the pandemic on the BioRescue project are described in detail in a scientific paper published in the “Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research”.

 

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Fledermaus, Großes Mausohr, Foto: M Fritze, Leibniz-IZW
Fledermaus, Großes Mausohr, Foto: M Fritze, Leibniz-IZW

How European hibernating bats cope with white-nose syndrome which kills millions of North American bats

Fungal diseases are a major threat to wildlife, sometimes resulting in significant population declines or even causing the extirpation of populations or species. White-nose syndrome, caused by the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has become a major cause of death for hibernating bats in North America. European bats survive when infected by the same fungus during hibernation. What are the reasons for such a contrast in outcomes? A scientist team led by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) has now analysed the humoral innate immune defence of European greater mouse-eared bats to the fungus. In contrast to North American bats, European bats have sufficient baseline levels of key immune parameters and thus tolerate a certain level of infection throughout hibernation. The results are published in the journal "Developmental and Comparative Immunology".

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Freshly isolated African lion oocytes, Foto: J. Zahmel
Freshly isolated African lion oocytes, Foto: J. Zahmel

Scientists produce the first in-vitro embryos from vitrified African lion oocytes

A team of scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) inGermany, Givskud Zoo - Zootopia in Denmark and the University of Milan in Italy succeeded in producing the very first African lion in-vitro embryos after the vitrification of immature oocytes. For this specific method of cryopreservation, oocytes are collected directly after an animal is castrated or deceased and immediately frozen at -196°C in liquid nitrogen. This technique allows the storage of oocytes of valuable animals for an unlimited time, so that they can be used to produce offspring with the help of assisted reproduction techniques. The aim is to further improve and apply these methods to save highly endangered species such as the Asiatic lion from extinction. The current research on African lions as a model species is an important step in this direction. The results are reported in the scientific journal “Cryobiology”.

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Hedgehog monitoring in a Berlin park (Photo: Anne Berger)
Hedgehog monitoring in a Berlin park (Photo: Anne Berger)

Recent hedgehog conservation research fills important research gaps on hedgehogs in the Anthropocene

Hedgehogs live both in the countryside and larger cities. As populations continue to decline, especially in rural areas, most hedgehogs in central Europe are now urban dwellers. To efficiently protect these populations, the suitability of their traits and life histories for life in human-dominated habitats need to be better understood. The new special issue on "applied hedgehog conservation research" of the scientific journal "Animals", co-edited by Dr Anne Berger of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), fills an important part of this research gap. One of the new research results published in the special issue: Hedgehogs are not very mobile, yet despite considerable barriers in the cityscape, such as roads or waterways, they do not become isolated from each other and still function as one population. This was indicated by sufficient gene flow and a lack of genetic population structure of the hedgehogs in Berlin. The authors conclude that both green spaces and corridors in the city on the one hand and translocations by hedgehog carers on the other are key to the gene flow and thus to the resilience of local hedgehog populations.

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IZW in the media

BBC video on the Northern White Rhino Rescue reaches more than 1,3 million views on youtube and more than 9,5 million views on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2685812534841992).

 

12.01.2021 | arte
Wie gefährlich sind Zoonosen für den Menschen?

09.12.2020 | rbb Inforadio
Geparden in Namibia: "Ein Szeneclub wie in einer Großstadt"

29.11.2020 | U.S. News
'D-Day' for Pakistan's Lonely Elephant as Handlers Prepare Airlift to Cambodia

24.11.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Vogelgrippe-Alarm an der Küste

10.11.2020 | Deutschlandfunk Kultur, Kakadu
Hilfe für Fledermäuse. Was können wir für Fledermäuse tun?

01.11.2020 | Scientific American
 

02.09.2020 | The Independent
Covid deals a blow to saving critically endangered Northern White rhino

24.08.2020 | Radio1
Naturschutz: Fledermäuse suchen Winterquartiere

23.08.2020 | Volksstimme
Grottenolme: Hoffnung auf Nachwuchs

23.08.2020 | BILD am Sonntag
Neue Hoffnung für die letzten Nashörner | Wissenschaftler konnten Eizellen von Nördlichen Breitmaulnashörnern entnehmen

22.08.2020 | Radio1
Wildtoxikologie: Bleimunition tötet jährlich tausende Vögel

18.08.2020 | abcNEWS
More eggs harvested from last 2 northern white rhinos

18.08.2020 | SWIswissinfo
Scientists harvest more eggs from near-extinct northern white rhino

18.08.2020 | Tagesspiegel
Es begab sich aber zu der Zeit, da alle Eichhörnchen geschätzt werden sollten

15.08.2020 | rbb Fernsehen
rbb Wissenszeit: Fledermäuse - Heimliche Wanderer

12.08.2020 | Leibniz-Magazin
Grünes Dilemma - Abertausende Fledermäuse sterben jedes Jahr an deutschen Windrädern. Und zeigen: Wenn Klima- und Artenschutz in Konflikt geraten, wird es kompliziert.

10.08.2020 | Berliner Zeitung
Touristen stressen Seeadler

09.08.2020 | SkyNews
Scientists try to create first rhino test tube baby to save near-extinct species

17.07.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Antiheld aus der Grotte

16.07.2020 | Redaktionsnetzwerk Deutschland
Neue Pandemien durch Wildtiere? Experte warnt vor Umweltzerstörung

11.07.2020 | Spiegel Online
Tierkrankheiten beim Menschen - "Auch die nächste Pandemie wird uns kalt erwischen"

06.07.2020 | Mongabay
For two rhino species on brink of extinction, it’s collaboration vs. stonewalling

03.07.2020 | Spiegel Online
Clans im Matriarchat - Das wundersame Sozialverhalten der Tüpfelhyänen

30.06.2020 | Spiegel Online
Nashorn-Rettungsversuch: Sie sind die letzten ihrer Art

27.06.2020 | stern
Was tun, wenn es nur noch Weibchen gibt?

25.06.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Wegen Paarung mit Hund abgeschossene Wölfin nicht trächtig

25.06.2020 | Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Der Fuchs: Was den scheuen Räuber so faszinierend macht

22.06.2020 | Spektrum der Wissenschaft
Naturschutz: Wird bleihaltige Jagdmunition endlich verboten?

22.06.2020 | Berliner Zeitung
Forscher warnen vor Hexenjagd auf Fledermäuse wegen Corona

18.06.2020 | BILD
Rettung für die Nashörner, Serengeti Park bei Projekt dabei

17.06.2020 | ScienceDaily
Oocyte collection and embryo creation in southern white rhinos

17.06.2020 | Phys.Org
Researchers perform southern white rhino oocyte collection and embryo creation

16.06.2020 | RTL
Vom Aussterben bedroht: Serengeti-Park Hodenhagen hilft bei Rettung der Breitmaulnashörner

17.06.2020 | Stuttgarter Zeitung
Fledermäuse in den Fängen von Windrädern

16.06.2020 | la Repubblica
Rinoceronte bianco del nord, nuove speranze di salvarlo dall'estinzione

13.06.2020 | Radio1
Berliner Füchse verlassen die Stadt nicht

06.06.2020 | Radio1
Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften - Die Koexistenz von Mensch und Tier

06.06.2020 | Volksstimme
Grottenolme - Weltsensation aus Rübeland

05.06.2020 | Bayrischer Rundfunk
Rangordnung im Tierreich - Auf deinen Platz!

05.06.2020 | Berliner Zeitung
Berliner Füchse haben keine Lust auf Brandenburg

29.05.2020 | The Hindu
In the wake of unverified rumours linking bats to the novel coronavirus, bats have suddenly emerged as villains

25.05.2020 | Spektrum der Wissenschaft
Fledermaus-Angst: »Das ist eine regelrechte Hexenjagd«

23.05.2020 | Focus
Nashorn aus der Dose

15.05.2020 | Spektrum der Wissenschaft
Der Wolf hätte fast überall Platz

25.04.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Tiere: Forschung zur Rettung von Nashorn-Unterart "auf Eis"

20.04.2020 | New York Times
When Crocodiles Once Dived Like Dolphins and Whales

20.04.2020 | The Guardian
Ancient ocean-going crocodiles mimicked whales and dolphins

14.04.2020 | BBC
Northern white rhinos: The audacious plan that could save a species

14.04.2020 | La Repubblica
Kenya, un laboratorio italiano salverà il rinoceronte bianco

13.03.2020 | La Stampa
Le Wallaby della palude possono essere incinte tutta la vita

11.03.2020 | Fox News
This adorable animal spends its entire adult life pregnant

03.03.2020 | Süddeutsche Zeitung
Biologie: Wallaby-Kängurus können doppelt trächtig werden

02.03.2020 | The New York Times
This Mom Is Still Pregnant. But She’s Already Having Another Baby

02.03.2020 | Smithsonian Magazine
Swamp Wallabies Can Get Pregnant While Pregnant

02.03.2020 | National Geographic
This marsupial is the only animal that's always pregnant

21.02.2020 | ZDF
planet e.: Artenschutz extrem - Erhalt um jeden Preis?