Cheetah. Portas R_Leibniz-IZW
Cheetah. Portas R_Leibniz-IZW

Cheetah populations are endangered – Red List status should be immediately upgraded

A comprehensive assessment of cheetah populations in southern Africa reveals the critical state of one of the planet’s most iconic big cats. An international group of scientists presents evidence that realistic population estimates of cheetah in southern Africa are lower than previously recognised and that their population decline support a call to list the cheetah as “Endangered” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List.  ...

Fruit fly (Violin Fly)/Patrick Debelle
Fruit fly (Violin Fly)/Patrick Debelle

Contests for female attention turns males into better performers - in fruit flies

Giving females an opportunity to choose the male they mate with leads to the evolution of better performing males, according to new research into the behaviour of fruit flies performed by University of Sheffield, University of St Andrews and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in Berlin, Germany. ...

Saola cameratrap 2013 WWF
Saola cameratrap 2013 WWF

Establishing a conservation breeding programme to save the last saola

The saola (Pseudoryx nghetinhensis), a primitive wild cattle endemic to the Annamite mountain range in Vietnam and Lao People’s Democratic Republic (PDR), is in immediate danger of extinction. The primary threat to its survival is intensive commercial snaring to supply the thriving wild meat trade in Indochina. In order to save the saola it is essential to establish a conservation breeding programme. In a letter published in Science, a group of conservationists and conservation scientists, including members of the IUCN Saola Working Group and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research Berlin, have voiced their concern about the future of the species and stressed the importance of urgent ex situ management....

ANTON MOLNÁR
ANTON MOLNÁR

Charity auction to save the Northern White Rhino from extinction

with presenter Nina Ruge and Andreas Knieriem, Director of Berlin Zoo

Thursday, 5th of October 2017, 4.00 p.m. Hotel Kempinski ADLON Berlin

more...

Dr. Frank Göritz (links) bei einem Rettungseinsatz im Gazastreifen
Dr. Frank Göritz (links) bei einem Rettungseinsatz im Gazastreifen

Leibniz IZW researcher receives international “Four Paws Animal Welfare Award”

On September 11th, Dr. Frank Göritz, scientist and Head Veterinarian received the “Vier Pfoten Tierschutzpreis” in Vienna....

Gudrun Wibbelt/Leibniz-IZW
Red squirrel with poxvirus lesions. Gudrun Wibbelt/Leibniz-IZW

Novel poxvirus threatens juvenile squirrels 

A previously unknown poxvirus causes severe disease in European red squirrels from Germany. Molecular genetic investigations revealed a new virus species ...

Author: Zoo Berlin
Author: Zoo Berlin

Leibniz IZW welcomes Berlin panda bears  

Researchers from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz IZW) support the Berlin Zoo in their future panda breeding programme....

Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on Earth
Satellite data to map endangered monkey populations on Earth

Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led bythe Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research....

Author: O. Lindecke/Leibniz-IZW
Author: O. Lindecke/Leibniz-IZW

Nathusius and Soprano bats are attracted to green light

A new study challenges the tenet that herpes viruses, like most enveloped viruses, are relatively unstable outside their host. Under a variety of conditions equine herpesvirus remained stable and infectious over a three week period. This suggests that untreated water could be a source of infection by some herpesviruses. The results are reported in the scientific journal “Scientific Reports”....

Equine herpresvirus, Author: Walid A/Leibniz-IZW
Equine herpresvirus, Author: Walid A/Leibniz-IZW

Can airborne viruses survive in water?

A new study challenges the tenet that herpes viruses, like most enveloped viruses, are relatively unstable outside their host. Under a variety of conditions equine herpesvirus remained stable and infectious over a three week period. This suggests that untreated water could be a source of infection by some herpesviruses. The results are reported in the scientific journal “Scientific Reports”.

 

 

 

Wild boars in Berlin, Author: David Wiemer/Leibniz-IZW
Wild boars in Berlin, Author: David Wiemer/Leibniz-IZW

Wild heart: urban wild boars prefer natural food resources

Different than expected, wild boars do not come to Berlin in order to use garbage or other anthropogenic food resources. In fact, also in the city they predominantly consume natural resources. This is the surprising result of a study conducted by the Leibniz-Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), financially supported by National Geographic and the „Stiftung Naturschutz Berlin“. The researchers analysed the stomachs of 247 wild boars from Berlin and the surrounding countryside. The results have been published in the scientific journal „PLOS ONE“. ...

Handling cheetah, Author: Wachter/Leibniz-IZW
Handling cheetah, Author: Wachter/Leibniz-IZW

How cheetahs stay fit and healthy

Cheetahs are categorised as vulnerable species, partly because they have been considered to be prone to diseases due to their supposed weak immune system. However, they are hardly ever sick in the wild. A research team from the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) recently discovered that cheetahs have developed a very efficient innate “first line of defence” immunity to compensate potential deficiencies in other components of their immune system. The scientists have published their results in the open access journal “Scientific Reports” of the Nature Publishing Group....

ovum pick up southern white rhino, author Leibniz-IZW
ovum pick up southern white rhino, author Leibniz-IZW

The Northern White Rhino – Advanced Reproductive Technologies Provide a Realistic Chance for Saving the Critically Endangered Species

In early March, Dvůr Králové Zoo, Czech Republic, hosted a meeting of the European Northern White Rhino Working Group. The international experts aim at saving the northern white rhino from the brink of extinction. With the three last individuals incapable of natural breeding, it is the most endangered mammal at present. The meeting in Dvůr Králové proved that collection of eggs, known as ovum pick-up (OPU), from the last two females can be conducted in the foreseeable future. The advanced OPU technique was developed for these large (two tons) creatures in the past two years in the closely related southern white rhino. Gamete collection was combined with advanced in-vitro egg maturation and fertilisation protocols....

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Welcome to the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research!

Willkommen am Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung (IZW)! Deutsche Version der IZW-Webseite.

The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) is an interdisciplinary research institute dedicated to developing the scientific basis for novel approaches to wildlife conservation.

In the current era of the Anthropocene, virtually all ecosystems in the world are subjected to man-made impacts. As yet, it is not possible to predict the response of wildlife to the ever-increasing global change. Why are some wildlife species threatened by anthropogenic change, while others persist or even thrive in modified, degenerated or novel habitats?

To answer this and related questions, the IZW conducts basic and applied research across different scientific disciplines. We study the diversity of life histories and evolutionary adaptations and their limits, including diseases, of free-ranging and captive wildlife species, and their interactions with people and their environment in Germany, Europe and worldwide.

The IZW is a member of the Leibniz Association and the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.