Young capercaillie. Poto: Ingo Decker
Young capercaillie. Poto: Ingo Decker

Swedish capercaillies are becoming real citizens in Brandenburg

Bad Liebenwerda, Germany - Using molecular genetic tools, scientists have demonstrated the existence of a grandchildren’s generation of capercaillies in the south of Brandenburg in East Germany. A pilot conservation project reintroduced these endangered birds to the German nature reserves “Niederlausitzer Heidelandschaft” and “Niederlausitzer Landrücken” as recently as 2012. The founder population was wild caught in Sweden and then transferred to Brandenburg. ...

Wild guinea pigs. Photo: Alexandra Weyrich/IZW
Wild guinea pigs. Photo: Alexandra Weyrich/IZW

Like father like son: Increased ambient temperatures lead to epigenetic modifications in exposed wild guinea pigs which can even be transmitted to the next generation

Fathers are able to adjust to increasing temperatures within their own lifetime and do transmit this information to their offspring. This has now been shown for the first time in a wild animal. The findings were the result of a project within the Joint Initiative for Research and Innovation and have been published in the scientific journal “Molecular Ecology”. ...

The northern white rhino Nabiré, a 32-year-old female at ZOO Dvůr Králové, sadly died on 27th July, 2015. Photo: Joel Satore
The northern white rhino Nabiré, a 32-year-old female at ZOO Dvůr Králové, sadly died on 27th July, 2015. Photo: Joel Satore

Reproduction and stem cell researchers set up a rescue plan for Northern White Rhino

International scientists set up a rescue plan for the worldwide last three northern white rhinos (Ceratotherium simum cottoni). The goal is to use the remaining three rhinos and tissue samples from already dead individuals to multiply them into a viable self-sustaining population. For this purpose scientists apply recent findings in reproduction and stem cell research....

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Welcome to the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research!

Willkommen am Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung (IZW)! Deutsche Version der IZW-Webseite.

The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) is an interdisciplinary research institute dedicated to developing the scientific basis for novel approaches to wildlife conservation.

In the current era of the Anthropocene, virtually all ecosystems in the world are subjected to man-made impacts. As yet, it is not possible to predict the response of wildlife to the ever-increasing global change. Why are some wildlife species threatened by anthropogenic change, while others persist or even thrive in modified, degenerated or novel habitats?

To answer this and related questions, the IZW conducts basic and applied research across different scientific disciplines. We study the diversity of life histories and evolutionary adaptations and their limits, including diseases, of free-ranging and captive wildlife species, and their interactions with people and their environment in Germany, Europe and worldwide.

The IZW is a member of the Leibniz Association and the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.