02 – Flat-headed cat: camera-trapped in Tangkulap Forest Reserve, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo on 18 March 2009. Credit: Mohamed & Wilting/IZW, SFD, SWD
02 – Flat-headed cat: camera-trapped in Tangkulap Forest Reserve, Sabah, Malaysian Borneo on 18 March 2009. Credit: Mohamed & Wilting/IZW, SFD, SWD

Roadmap for better protection of Borneo’s cats and small carnivores

Habitat conversion and fragmentation, logging, illegal hunting, fires: The rainforests and wildlife on Borneo, the third largest island in the world, are highly threatened. Now, an international research team under the leadership of the German Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) and the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Species Survival Commission, has published a roadmap for more targeted conservation efforts for Bornean cats and small carnivores in a special supplement of the Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. ...

Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx). Photo: Marijke Autenrieth
Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx). Photo: Marijke Autenrieth

Reintroduction of lynx requires larger numbers to avoid genetic depletion

For successful reintroduction of lynx into the wild, the number of released animals is crucial. If only a few lynx are reintroduced to found a population, the genetic diversity is too low to ensure their long-term sustainability. An international research team has recently published these findings in the scientific journal “Conservation Genetics”. The researchers highlight the need to strengthen newly established European lynx populations by additional translocations of lynx as well as other conservation measures....

Javan leopard (Panthera pardus melas). Photo: Christian Kern/Tierpark Berlin
Javan leopard (Panthera pardus melas). Photo: Christian Kern/Tierpark Berlin

The evolution of the Javan leopard and the urgent need for its conservation

An international team of researchers from Germany and Indonesia has discovered new insights into the evolutionary history of the Javan leopard. The results of the study confirm that Javan leopards are clearly distinct from Asian leopards and probably colonised Java around 600,000 years ago via a land bridge from mainland Asia. The study, published in the scientific journal “Journal of Zoology”, highlights the urgent need for concerted conservation efforts to preserve the Javan leopard from extinction...

Northern White Rhino. Photo: Joel Sartore
Northern White Rhino. Photo: Joel Sartore

Seeking to Rewind Mammalian Extinction – The Effort to Save the Northern White Rhino

In December 2015 an international group of scientists convened in Austria to discuss the imminent extinction of the northern white rhinoceros and the possibility of bringing the species back from brink of extinction. The discussions of this historic meeting appear in the international Journal Zoo Biology. The publication of this work is designed as part of the ongoing effort to raise awareness for the extinction crisis facing rhinos and many other species while also reaching out to the scientific community to share and gather information...

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Welcome to the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research!

Willkommen am Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung (IZW)! Deutsche Version der IZW-Webseite.

The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) is an interdisciplinary research institute dedicated to developing the scientific basis for novel approaches to wildlife conservation.

In the current era of the Anthropocene, virtually all ecosystems in the world are subjected to man-made impacts. As yet, it is not possible to predict the response of wildlife to the ever-increasing global change. Why are some wildlife species threatened by anthropogenic change, while others persist or even thrive in modified, degenerated or novel habitats?

To answer this and related questions, the IZW conducts basic and applied research across different scientific disciplines. We study the diversity of life histories and evolutionary adaptations and their limits, including diseases, of free-ranging and captive wildlife species, and their interactions with people and their environment in Germany, Europe and worldwide.

The IZW is a member of the Leibniz Association and the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.