Przewalski's horses. Photo: Ludovic Orlando
Przewalski's horses. Photo: Ludovic Orlando

After 100 Years in Captivity, a Look at the World’s Last Truly Wild Horses

For the first time, an international team of researchers has sequenced the complete genomes of eleven Przewalski’s horses, including all of the founding lineages and five historical, museum specimens dating back more than a century. They compared these to the genomes of 28 domesticated horses to provide a detailed look at the endangered animals, both past and present. The current study has recently been published in the Cell Press journal “Current Biology”...

Adult white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) feeding on carcass. Photo: Oliver Krone
Adult white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) feeding on carcass. Photo: Oliver Krone

White-tailed eagles avoid large bullet fragments during consumption of carcasses

White-tailed eagles detect and avoid the ingestion of large metal particles (larger than 8 mm) but ignore smaller metal particles whilst feeding on shot mammalian carcasses. Lead-based bullets split into numerous small metal fragments when penetrating an animal’s body, whereas lead-free rifle bullets either deform without leaving any particles in the tissue or fragment into larger particles. Thus, the use of lead-free bullets may prevent lead poisoning of scavengers...

Welcome to the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research!

Willkommen am Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung (IZW)! Deutsche Version der IZW-Webseite.

The Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) is an interdisciplinary research institute dedicated to developing the scientific basis for novel approaches to wildlife conservation.

In the current era of the Anthropocene, virtually all ecosystems in the world are subjected to man-made impacts. As yet, it is not possible to predict the response of wildlife to the ever-increasing global change. Why are some wildlife species threatened by anthropogenic change, while others persist or even thrive in modified, degenerated or novel habitats?

To answer this and related questions, the IZW conducts basic and applied research across different scientific disciplines. We study the diversity of life histories and evolutionary adaptations and their limits, including diseases, of free-ranging and captive wildlife species, and their interactions with people and their environment in Germany, Europe and worldwide.

The IZW is a member of the Leibniz Association and the Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.